Posts Tagged ‘re-purposing’

Josh working with his bees

My husband, Josh Morris, is really into bees. He is officially a beekeeper (apiarist) {beekeeper is a person who keeps honey bees (i.e. practices beekeeping). Honey bees produce commodities such as honey, beeswax, pollen, and royal jelly, while some beekeepers also raise queens and bees to sell to other farmers, and to satisfy scientific curiosity.}

My husband also rescues honey bees within the state of Georgia when pest control companies are called or even 911 emergency regarding bees. My husband goes out and rescues a honeybee hive if someone calls, for example, and has bees nesting in the walls of their home, their chimney or a tree on their property, etc.

Interestingly, it is not illegal to kill honey bees, per the Georgia Department of Agriculture website which states, “This is a common misconception, even within the pest control industry. Although the Georgia legislature named the honey bee as the state’s ‘official’ insect, the designation does not offer any legal or regulatory protection.”  For many people, the common myth that it is illegal to kill honeybees does save many hives and colonies of bees.

My husband has been working on a solar wax melting project. He is re-purposing household items to use in the process of making something to naturally melt beeswax.

Beeswax is anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-allergenic, and has germicidal antioxidant pure melted beeswaxproperties which make it beneficial for wound healing too!

Re-purposing beeswax is effective and productive in many ways, besides also helping bees.  Beeswax is not melted down naturally just in order to make candles! I found this to be an interesting topic and thought I would write about this to increase awareness regarding bees, how to work with honey bees instead of against them and how we’re doing our part to help save the bees.

To assist a beekeeper (apiarian), we offer portable storage buildings.  Our portable sheds are well suited for the storage of beekeeping supplies (supers, frames, extractors, etc.) as well as keeping honey and even bees themselves!

 Below you will see pictured the solar wax melting technique we are trying out.  It is an ice chest/cooler, as shown.  Inside, Josh has placed a section of the R-4.3 insulation, which is used on the metal garages we well.  (R-4.3 insulation:  ¼” double-bubble insulation in the units that we build. The price is $1.00 per square foot (of side-wall, end-wall, and roof square footage). It has an R-Value of 4.3. To determine the cost visit here.)

After placing the insulation in the cooler, Josh next put a brass thermometer in order to see how high a temperature was achieved in the cooler.  The last few steps were to place a piece of Plexiglas on the cooler and secure it with a common clay brick on each end.  This way, there is a clear view into the melter and we can see the temperature easily.

Josh decided to try this method and inside the solar wax melter, he was able to achieve 150-170 degree temperatures in less than 2 hours time, on an overcast day at that!

I hope you have enjoyed this overview of our solar wax melting project!  -SLM


 Solar Wax Melting Project   

Temperature of Solar Wax Melting

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