Archive for the ‘Sheds’ Category

This week I have been recovering from PRK surgery (today is 2 weeks post-op).  I have also been working on a slew of pages on our website where I am updating title tags and META information, just to name a few updates.  While I was performing these site updates, I got to thinking how I might be able to help the kids appreciate those who have less by actually living with less.  It really is possible to live in one of our portable storage buildings or garages at an economical price, by the way.

Simplification? Less is More

copyright www.becomingminimalist.com Today, we had a discussion as a family of four regarding simplification.  We are considering going very simple for one week and limiting ourselves in order to appreciate what we have and reduce our impact on the environment.  Perhaps as a result of simplifying family life, we could make some semi-permanent or permanent changes after our experiment concludes, we shall see.

You said what?  How can I go one week without checking my Clash of Clans or text messages?  How can I survive without using packaging of any kind?  What if I miss important text messages?  Answers: online games are just that, online, and we can play cards or a board game as a family for entertainment.  We do not have to use paper towels, cardboard packaging or plastic bottles to eat, drink and stay clean.  Without text messages as communication, someone will just have to pick up the phone and give their friend a ring!

Materialism in general just seems to be a big issue all over the United States, especially compared to other parts of the world.  Most urban areas of the USA are very modern and hardly any “small town” lacks for anything:  almost everyone has the Internet, television, etc.  It is very easy to see what other people have and personally want more of it because we don’t have it.  Pretty soon, a snowball effect starts happening, where we either buy to much or try to compensate for materialistic desires in other ways.  It is not what we have that is the problem, it is cultivating a desire for more more more!  No matter what, the desire to be rich or have a bunch materially can and will catch us in a snare.

Side Note:  In our family, we are not aesthetics, nor are we considering this limitation for any type of religious connections or any spiritual or emotional voodoo.  We are not trying to deny ourselves to try to be psychotic; we merely want to see how we could benefit by considering what we already have; “You don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone” kind of thing.


hotelzon.comHere is a basic outline of what we are considering to reduce our family footprint for one week:

  • No electronics such as TV, tablets, smart phones, etc. (since we work from home, we will heed to use the Internet to make a living but this electronics restriction applies to leisure time).
  • Drink only water or herbal tea.  This means that we would not have any caffeinated, sugary or sweetened beverages.
  • Eat healthy, raw foods, no processed junk.  Basically, by this I mean fruits and veggies and rice (as examples) but the food would not be “junk food”; having no chemicals or preservatives in it.  We have a small garden already and we can make use of this space for fresh, healthy raw foods.
  • Try not to use electricity:  Obviously, I know we need to use electricity (again, since we work from home online, there is that).  I just want to see how much we can limit our utility use, perhaps reducing the electric bill.  Maybe we can save money and use candles after dark!
  • No air conditioning:  Summer is in full swing here in Georgia, so we would definitely feel the affects of turning off the AC, however I think it can be done.  People used to live without air conditioning in this same hot, humid weather and many people still do!
  • Limit shower time to 5-7 minutes per person:  This saves hot water and what needs to be done to get clean can be accomplished within this time frame.  Another hot water heater savings would be to only wash our clothing in cold water (which I already do).
  • Each person keeps their own eating materials clean and simple:  So we would have one of each of the following:  fork, spoon, knife, plate, bowl and glass.  Each family member would see to it that their utensils, etc. were washed and dried after each use.  To cut down on the need to wash extra items, we would only use one of each per person for the week.  If someone gets ready to eat and they are missing a fork for instance, then they have to go find their fork and make sure it’s clean before eating; they can’t just grab another fork and move on.
  • Try to limit clothing use:  By this I mean grabbing another clean shirt when the one we have on is perfectly fine.  Sometimes, for whatever reason, we end up changing more than once per day and this would cut out the extra clothing use.  Of course we would be clean but there are clothing items that can be re-worn before washing (not underwear of course!).  This idea boils down to one week laundry cycles.  We would start out the week with all clean clothing but not wash anything during the one week or wear more than one outfit per day.
  • Use only natural items:  Try not to use throw-away plastic bottles, paper towels, or items that have packaging.

I think trying out this idea would show our family that we can live on less while still seeing how much of an impact we have on the environment.  Plus overall, as mentioned previously, I think we would learn to appreciate what we have more after this experiment was over.  This is the kind of thing that can be learned much better by practice rather than explanation and at the very least we can say we tried something new and stuck with it fully for one week!

What are your thoughts about simplicity?

If you want to try living a more simple life and you are serious about downsizing, consider a “tiny house” idea with one of our economical portable buildings or insulated garages.  Some people are very serious about the idea of living in extreme simplicity and having a home that it portable makes things even easier.  You could still have water/sewer hookup, HVAC, electrical, etc. and enjoy a much smaller and more simplified, yet secure, abode.

 

 

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Simplify:  Downsizing, minimizing or minimalizing and repurposing all bring to mind living within or beneath one’s means, wouldn’t you say? This would make us think of living a simple life, living with less, cleaning up and getting rid of unwanted or unnecessary stuff. Lately this has been on my mind, perhaps because we are now officially into Spring and the weather has been a positive motivation toward getting things done. It has been my goal for some time to have LESS “stuff” in our home, keeping in mind the saying that “Less is more”.

This whole concept of simplicity in general may be easier said than done. A lot of us have things that we just do not want, need or can no longer maintain, all “stuff”.

Keep It Or Not?  One way I have found useful in order to determine if I can do without an item is to put it in a specific place for a period of 6 months. This may seem to be a long period of time and for some items, it is. It may not be necessary to hold on to something for six months, especially if it will not be used or needed again, however this is just for items that I am not sure about. Then, I will set an alarm on my phone and at the 6 month time, go to my designated spot and evaluate whether i need the item (perhaps seasonal clothing, camping items, etc.) If I am still not using the item in question by this time, it can go one of two ways: either it can go directly to one of 3 piles, “donations”, “keep” or “sell” or secondly, it can stay right where it is for another set time period to see whether it will be useful in the future.

We can downsize, as mentioned in this article, minimalize in order to live a simpler lifestyle and repurpose the items that we already have, in order to make our lives easier and more green.

Storage:  Homes in the US just do not seem to be built with sufficient storage for the families that fill them these days. We usually end up with more stuff than we may want or need, but we do need a place to put our belongings.  For me, this time-tested idea does require that I have a specific location in my home or storage buildings and garages set aside to be a temporary holding place for “stuff”. I have a GPB storage building, which is easy to set up with labeled sections for items that need to be stored.

Portable storage buildings from GPB, Inc make a lot of sense because they can be set up and leveled and kept dry and vermin/bug-free. Why would you want to invest in a portable storage building if you are trying to get rid of extra “stuff”?  Two reasons to invest in a portable building include:  (1) It can be moved in the future if you want to sell it back or trade it in for a larger (or smaller) building, (2) In case your family moves in the future it is fairly easy to move the building as well – so the building can even be a temporary storage place (3) Portable buildings add value to home and property and the building could be sold already installed if you choose.

Solve:  We are interested in how to solve the problem of too much stuff and not enough simplicity and a great solution is to just make the decision and get it done.  We know what we can live with and without and just taking the initiative to solve the problem is really what is required.  What if you knew you could buy a car that was nice for your family: it had great safety features, got good gas mileage and was the right size, plus it allowed you to save money to go on a vacation or two extra per year.  Even if the car has a few cons or things you didn’t like as much, would you invest in it?  Most people would buy that car.  How willing are we to part with items (or “stuff”) that could make us money, help others, save us money on taxes or go right into our savings account?  Like that great car, we can make sound decisions to solve our “stuff” problem by taking the steps now and deciding what we want to keep, sell or donate.  In the meantime, a great step toward solving our storage problem is to look into a portable storage building, garage or utility shed from GPB, Inc., a trusted source for secure and sturdy storage structures across the USA.

Right now, somewhere online, people are searching for security metal sheds and garages; while others are looking for portable single metal car garages. There are people who want to find more information about travel trailer sheds as well.

What if you want to install a carport on unlevel ground?

All of these topics and more are covered on our website: answers to your questions, online price quotes, instant pricing as well as photos of installed structures, color choices and online ordering.

10′x20′ buckskin and cream©Portable: When a portable storage building is described as such, it should be completely portable. The building should have complete structural integrity. It should be capable of movement with skids and joists on the floor system underneath the building, and effectively, it should have a completely pressure-treated floor system.

The better the floor system in the portable storage building, the better the building. How better to move a portable storage building than to gauge it by its floor support system. So a good floor system is essential. Complete structural integrity encapsulates the fact that it should be throughout the life of the portable storage building.

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Strength: When you buy a portable building, of course it should be strong. But what about 5, 10 or 20 years down the road? Will your storage building be PORTABLE at that point? Would a crew or a few guys be able to pull your storage shed out on its skids, load it up and move it without it buckling because of structural ineptitude, years of water damage or a sagging floor?

Important questions when you are considering the purchase of a building that you may just end up replacing, are they not? This is especially true when you are may be storing expensive, personal items in your portable storage building or unit. Remember, the strength of a pressure-treated floor system and a well-made, warrantied building can mean protection for your items – what you want – besides the added strength which is what you need as well.

Integrity: Let’s face it, a portable storage building is not a buy-it-and-toss-it type of purchase. Why not buy a portable storage building that is built to last? My husband always says, “Buy the best, leave the rest.” There are just some things that are worth checking into first and portable buildings is one of them. Like I always write – doing your homework first pays off; there is just integrity in that.

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This work is licensed under a
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S.M. March 27, 2008 @ 12:00

Do you have trouble finding space in your house to store your things? I do not think that houses are built with enough storage space anymore. There are probably many reasons why houses are not built with enough closet space or small closets. But that creates the need for outdoor storage or backyard storage. What about portable sheds? A lot of people pay for mini warehouses every month but that can get expensive too. It would be irritating to run out of options in just another way because of less space.

I do not even have a simple coat closet for guests in the house I live in and it is quite new.  I guess homes are not built with closetspace planned in advance.  So where do people store things that are not used on a regular basis?  Storage shed space is a good thing if it is paid for especially because then people do not have to rent space and keep paying to store their stuff.  If you own the storage space, you can keep it and use it for whatever you want.  If you buy a storage shed that is too small you can always upsize and the shed keeps its value.  Or if you buy big enough you will have planned ahead, so that you can store and store and have enough space for the future.  Then again, your shed is portable, so that if you move, your value is paid for and you can keep your shed or sell it if you want as well.

Did this article help you?  I hope so!


Creative Commons License


This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
SM 2.11.08