RV cover: 12′ wide x 26′ long x 8′ leg height x 10′ 6″ peak height with additional (optional) 2 – 3′ x 26′ panels (1 per side)

Carports for heat and cold protection keep your stuff out of the sun and snow. Protection from the elements is important because you can prevent sun damage, leaks, snow load problems and wind damage. Metal carports private protection from the elements including: Sun damage, paint damage, leaking roof on vehicles, cracked upholstery, baking sun, searing wind, heavy weight from snow and ice and much more.

There are many uses for metal carports and steel buildings that people have found productive. Carports are great for covering your valuable items as well as protecting your privacy. A closed-in carport is good for shade, sun and wind protection as well as privacy.

You can protect the space where you park your boat, camper or riding lawn mower. Imagine being able to get in and out of your car under a cover instead of outside in the rain or baking sun? Your car or truck cost money and you want to protect that valuable money you have invested in that vehicle. Why close in your home garage and leave your car or truck out in the weather? What if you could have a closed in garage and a covered place to park your truck or car too?

Some people like to have a carport with the sides and front enclosed for privacy. People do not always want neighbors and see and know things about when they come and go. Do you rent out part of your house? Give your tenant some where to park their car!

Cover your travel trailer with a metal carport or steel building. Instead of leaving your pop up or fifth wheel out in the rain and snow, cover it and protect it from the weather and mold or mildew problems with a steel carport or metal building. Honestly, who wants to use a moldy camper? You can prevent mold and mildew and keep it out of your camping plans by covering your RV or camper with a metal carport.

There are many uses for our inexpensive yet sturdy storage structures. Click or call us today for instant pricing or a free custom estimate to protect your belongings!

1-800-942-3745   www.gaport.com

Have you ever wondered whether you can accomplish a Do It Yourself or DIY project in your own back yard? What if you could make a screened-in room out of a carport? The idea is cost-effective and very useful for enjoying the outdoors just about all year long.  Many people have considered making a screened in room out a carport and many have succeeded.  What is involved in this task?

  • Decide if you want the screened carport to include space for storage
  • Decide if you want the carport to be a place to park your car, truck, boat, RV or riding lawn mower
  • Could the screened-in carport be a place for your family to enjoy time playing pool, ping pong or other activities?

You can screen in a carport at cost-effective prices and it makes for a lovely addition to your home or business.  Perhaps you need a place for an employee smoking shelter or group place to gather.  Family reunions are great for screened-in carports because they allow space to gather while still protecting people from bugs, birds and the elements.

 

This week I have been recovering from PRK surgery (today is 2 weeks post-op).  I have also been working on a slew of pages on our website where I am updating title tags and META information, just to name a few updates.  While I was performing these site updates, I got to thinking how I might be able to help the kids appreciate those who have less by actually living with less.  It really is possible to live in one of our portable storage buildings or garages at an economical price, by the way.

Simplification? Less is More

copyright www.becomingminimalist.com Today, we had a discussion as a family of four regarding simplification.  We are considering going very simple for one week and limiting ourselves in order to appreciate what we have and reduce our impact on the environment.  Perhaps as a result of simplifying family life, we could make some semi-permanent or permanent changes after our experiment concludes, we shall see.

You said what?  How can I go one week without checking my Clash of Clans or text messages?  How can I survive without using packaging of any kind?  What if I miss important text messages?  Answers: online games are just that, online, and we can play cards or a board game as a family for entertainment.  We do not have to use paper towels, cardboard packaging or plastic bottles to eat, drink and stay clean.  Without text messages as communication, someone will just have to pick up the phone and give their friend a ring!

Materialism in general just seems to be a big issue all over the United States, especially compared to other parts of the world.  Most urban areas of the USA are very modern and hardly any “small town” lacks for anything:  almost everyone has the Internet, television, etc.  It is very easy to see what other people have and personally want more of it because we don’t have it.  Pretty soon, a snowball effect starts happening, where we either buy to much or try to compensate for materialistic desires in other ways.  It is not what we have that is the problem, it is cultivating a desire for more more more!  No matter what, the desire to be rich or have a bunch materially can and will catch us in a snare.

Side Note:  In our family, we are not aesthetics, nor are we considering this limitation for any type of religious connections or any spiritual or emotional voodoo.  We are not trying to deny ourselves to try to be psychotic; we merely want to see how we could benefit by considering what we already have; “You don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone” kind of thing.


hotelzon.comHere is a basic outline of what we are considering to reduce our family footprint for one week:

  • No electronics such as TV, tablets, smart phones, etc. (since we work from home, we will heed to use the Internet to make a living but this electronics restriction applies to leisure time).
  • Drink only water or herbal tea.  This means that we would not have any caffeinated, sugary or sweetened beverages.
  • Eat healthy, raw foods, no processed junk.  Basically, by this I mean fruits and veggies and rice (as examples) but the food would not be “junk food”; having no chemicals or preservatives in it.  We have a small garden already and we can make use of this space for fresh, healthy raw foods.
  • Try not to use electricity:  Obviously, I know we need to use electricity (again, since we work from home online, there is that).  I just want to see how much we can limit our utility use, perhaps reducing the electric bill.  Maybe we can save money and use candles after dark!
  • No air conditioning:  Summer is in full swing here in Georgia, so we would definitely feel the affects of turning off the AC, however I think it can be done.  People used to live without air conditioning in this same hot, humid weather and many people still do!
  • Limit shower time to 5-7 minutes per person:  This saves hot water and what needs to be done to get clean can be accomplished within this time frame.  Another hot water heater savings would be to only wash our clothing in cold water (which I already do).
  • Each person keeps their own eating materials clean and simple:  So we would have one of each of the following:  fork, spoon, knife, plate, bowl and glass.  Each family member would see to it that their utensils, etc. were washed and dried after each use.  To cut down on the need to wash extra items, we would only use one of each per person for the week.  If someone gets ready to eat and they are missing a fork for instance, then they have to go find their fork and make sure it’s clean before eating; they can’t just grab another fork and move on.
  • Try to limit clothing use:  By this I mean grabbing another clean shirt when the one we have on is perfectly fine.  Sometimes, for whatever reason, we end up changing more than once per day and this would cut out the extra clothing use.  Of course we would be clean but there are clothing items that can be re-worn before washing (not underwear of course!).  This idea boils down to one week laundry cycles.  We would start out the week with all clean clothing but not wash anything during the one week or wear more than one outfit per day.
  • Use only natural items:  Try not to use throw-away plastic bottles, paper towels, or items that have packaging.

I think trying out this idea would show our family that we can live on less while still seeing how much of an impact we have on the environment.  Plus overall, as mentioned previously, I think we would learn to appreciate what we have more after this experiment was over.  This is the kind of thing that can be learned much better by practice rather than explanation and at the very least we can say we tried something new and stuck with it fully for one week!

What are your thoughts about simplicity?

If you want to try living a more simple life and you are serious about downsizing, consider a “tiny house” idea with one of our economical portable buildings or insulated garages.  Some people are very serious about the idea of living in extreme simplicity and having a home that it portable makes things even easier.  You could still have water/sewer hookup, HVAC, electrical, etc. and enjoy a much smaller and more simplified, yet secure, abode.

 

 

Have you ever seen metal buildings and wondered if people could live in one?  This metal building has been finished and furnished so that people could actually live here!  It is hard to imagine that this is a metal building on the outside when it looks so homey and cozy on the inside?  Check out these pictures of what can be done to make a metal building inhabitable, even trendy!  Inhabiting a metal building could be a very cost-effective lifestyle for people in this economy in many settings.  Living in a metal building could support a sustainable lifestyle, repurposing items for use in a friendly environment.  If you have any questions about perhaps trying this idea at your lake house or lake property or as a place in the woods, contact us and we will help you out.  You may think this living idea would work well as a cabin on property where you or your friends go hunting seasonally.  Whatever your metal building needs may be, feel free to let us know if you have questions and we will be happy to help you out with your sturdy structure.  This is simple living where you can live simply and enjoy your space!  This building idea is a great way to minimalize and downsize in order to live a more simple lifestyle.

 

Lami Building A Lami Building O
Lami Buidling C Lami Building D
Lami Building E Lami Building H
Lami Building B Lami Building I
Lami Building K Lami Building J

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Josh working with his bees

My husband, Josh Morris, is really into bees. He is officially a beekeeper (apiarist) {beekeeper is a person who keeps honey bees (i.e. practices beekeeping). Honey bees produce commodities such as honey, beeswax, pollen, and royal jelly, while some beekeepers also raise queens and bees to sell to other farmers, and to satisfy scientific curiosity.}

My husband also rescues honey bees within the state of Georgia when pest control companies are called or even 911 emergency regarding bees. My husband goes out and rescues a honeybee hive if someone calls, for example, and has bees nesting in the walls of their home, their chimney or a tree on their property, etc.

Interestingly, it is not illegal to kill honey bees, per the Georgia Department of Agriculture website which states, “This is a common misconception, even within the pest control industry. Although the Georgia legislature named the honey bee as the state’s ‘official’ insect, the designation does not offer any legal or regulatory protection.”  For many people, the common myth that it is illegal to kill honeybees does save many hives and colonies of bees.

My husband has been working on a solar wax melting project. He is re-purposing household items to use in the process of making something to naturally melt beeswax.

Beeswax is anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-allergenic, and has germicidal antioxidant pure melted beeswaxproperties which make it beneficial for wound healing too!

Re-purposing beeswax is effective and productive in many ways, besides also helping bees.  Beeswax is not melted down naturally just in order to make candles! I found this to be an interesting topic and thought I would write about this to increase awareness regarding bees, how to work with honey bees instead of against them and how we’re doing our part to help save the bees.

To assist a beekeeper (apiarian), we offer portable storage buildings.  Our portable sheds are well suited for the storage of beekeeping supplies (supers, frames, extractors, etc.) as well as keeping honey and even bees themselves!

 Below you will see pictured the solar wax melting technique we are trying out.  It is an ice chest/cooler, as shown.  Inside, Josh has placed a section of the R-4.3 insulation, which is used on the metal garages we well.  (R-4.3 insulation:  ¼” double-bubble insulation in the units that we build. The price is $1.00 per square foot (of side-wall, end-wall, and roof square footage). It has an R-Value of 4.3. To determine the cost visit here.)

After placing the insulation in the cooler, Josh next put a brass thermometer in order to see how high a temperature was achieved in the cooler.  The last few steps were to place a piece of Plexiglas on the cooler and secure it with a common clay brick on each end.  This way, there is a clear view into the melter and we can see the temperature easily.

Josh decided to try this method and inside the solar wax melter, he was able to achieve 150-170 degree temperatures in less than 2 hours time, on an overcast day at that!

I hope you have enjoyed this overview of our solar wax melting project!  -SLM


 Solar Wax Melting Project   

Temperature of Solar Wax Melting

Simplify:  Downsizing, minimizing or minimalizing and repurposing all bring to mind living within or beneath one’s means, wouldn’t you say? This would make us think of living a simple life, living with less, cleaning up and getting rid of unwanted or unnecessary stuff. Lately this has been on my mind, perhaps because we are now officially into Spring and the weather has been a positive motivation toward getting things done. It has been my goal for some time to have LESS “stuff” in our home, keeping in mind the saying that “Less is more”.

This whole concept of simplicity in general may be easier said than done. A lot of us have things that we just do not want, need or can no longer maintain, all “stuff”.

Keep It Or Not?  One way I have found useful in order to determine if I can do without an item is to put it in a specific place for a period of 6 months. This may seem to be a long period of time and for some items, it is. It may not be necessary to hold on to something for six months, especially if it will not be used or needed again, however this is just for items that I am not sure about. Then, I will set an alarm on my phone and at the 6 month time, go to my designated spot and evaluate whether i need the item (perhaps seasonal clothing, camping items, etc.) If I am still not using the item in question by this time, it can go one of two ways: either it can go directly to one of 3 piles, “donations”, “keep” or “sell” or secondly, it can stay right where it is for another set time period to see whether it will be useful in the future.

We can downsize, as mentioned in this article, minimalize in order to live a simpler lifestyle and repurpose the items that we already have, in order to make our lives easier and more green.

Storage:  Homes in the US just do not seem to be built with sufficient storage for the families that fill them these days. We usually end up with more stuff than we may want or need, but we do need a place to put our belongings.  For me, this time-tested idea does require that I have a specific location in my home or storage buildings and garages set aside to be a temporary holding place for “stuff”. I have a GPB storage building, which is easy to set up with labeled sections for items that need to be stored.

Portable storage buildings from GPB, Inc make a lot of sense because they can be set up and leveled and kept dry and vermin/bug-free. Why would you want to invest in a portable storage building if you are trying to get rid of extra “stuff”?  Two reasons to invest in a portable building include:  (1) It can be moved in the future if you want to sell it back or trade it in for a larger (or smaller) building, (2) In case your family moves in the future it is fairly easy to move the building as well – so the building can even be a temporary storage place (3) Portable buildings add value to home and property and the building could be sold already installed if you choose.

Solve:  We are interested in how to solve the problem of too much stuff and not enough simplicity and a great solution is to just make the decision and get it done.  We know what we can live with and without and just taking the initiative to solve the problem is really what is required.  What if you knew you could buy a car that was nice for your family: it had great safety features, got good gas mileage and was the right size, plus it allowed you to save money to go on a vacation or two extra per year.  Even if the car has a few cons or things you didn’t like as much, would you invest in it?  Most people would buy that car.  How willing are we to part with items (or “stuff”) that could make us money, help others, save us money on taxes or go right into our savings account?  Like that great car, we can make sound decisions to solve our “stuff” problem by taking the steps now and deciding what we want to keep, sell or donate.  In the meantime, a great step toward solving our storage problem is to look into a portable storage building, garage or utility shed from GPB, Inc., a trusted source for secure and sturdy storage structures across the USA.

Have you heard about this? AP published April 21, 2014 from Washington:

“President Obama’s administration has sided with American steel producers in an international trade dispute, ruling imported steel reinforcing bar from Mexico and Turkey unfairly undercuts U.S. prices.

Monday’s preliminary decision by the U.S. Department of Commerce means companies in Mexico and Turkey will be subject to immediate duties.

A final determination won’t be made until summer. But within a week the U.S. government will stop distribution at the nation’s borders until a cash bond or deposit is posted.

Steel reinforcing bar is known as steel rebar and is used to reinforce concrete. Steel producers in Mexico and Turkey have denied they’re violating trade laws.

The investigation by Commerce’s International Trade Administration was launched last fall at the request of U.S. steel producers. Companies from Ohio, Oregon, North Carolina, Florida and Texas filed complaints.” – foxnews.com

Notice this news, too from January 2014 regarding US challenging China’s non-compliance in WTO steel dispute:

U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman announced that the United States is requesting that China enter into consultations regarding China’s claim that it has brought its duties on U.S. exports of grain oriented flat-rolled electrical steel (GOES) into compliance with WTO rules.

GOES is a high-tech, high-value magnetic specialty steel that is used primarily by the power generating industry in transformers, rectifiers, reactors, and large electric machines.” –  ustr.gov

So where does this leave Americans interested or connected in some way to the steel industry?  Will you be affected?  Have you been affected by the US steel industry trade dispute?

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